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Home » News » 5 Important Eye Care Tips For Kids

5 Important Eye Care Tips For Kids

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Your child's ability to see the world relies on healthy eyes. By teaching them how to care for their eyes, parents help protect them from injury and ensure their eyes and vision remain healthy in the long run. Here are our 5 top eye care tips for kids.

Good Eye Care Habits for Children

1. Maintain a Healthy Diet and Drink Plenty of Water

A nutritious diet and healthy eyes go hand in hand. Encourage your child to eat healthy foods like fresh fruits and vegetables, and prioritize foods rich in vitamin A found in green leafy and yellow vegetables. Eggs are also rich in important nutrients, containing vitamin A, lutein, zeaxanthin, and zinc, all vital for eye health.

Another thing to look out for is hydration. Proper hydration plays a key role in maintaining healthy eyes and a healthy body, so make sure your child drinks plenty of water (the appropriate amount will vary according to your child's age, level of physical activity and weather conditions).

2. Wear Eye Protection

Physical activity is enjoyable and healthy, but make sure your child is wearing the right protective eyewear, like safety goggles, anytime they participate in sports or activities that could cause an eye injury (i.e. playing ball, hockey, carpentry). Wearing a helmet for sports like riding a bicycle protects against concussions, which can result in lingering vision problems, and are usually preventable.

Furthermore, don't forget to provide your child with quality UV-blocking sunglasses to protect  eyes from the sun’s damaging UV radiation. UV damage is cumulative over a lifetime and contributes to cataracts and macular degeneration in older years.  Staring directly at the sun, or the light rays reflecting off water and snow, is very dangerous and can potentially cause retinal burns, in addition to long term damage, and should be avoided at all times.

3. Give The Eyes a Rest

Staring at details on the school board and in school books all day, followed by playing video games or watching TV in the evening can cause eye fatigue. Be sure your child gets sufficient sleep to allow their eyes to rest. Replace evening activities with those that don't require intense eye focusing: going to the park, playing outdoors with friends, or simply lying down with their eyes closed while listening to music or an audiobook.

4. Reduce Time Spent on Digital Devices

Spending time on digital devices and staring at screens is an integral part of our lives. Playing video games, watching videos on their smartphones and playing computer games, all require the eyes to fixate for extended periods of time, which can lead to digital eye strain, headaches and even dry eyes.

Try to reduce the amount of time your child spends on the screen by getting your child to participate in other activities, such as sports. When using digital devices or screens, get them into the habit of taking frequent breaks (every 30 minutes or so) and give the eyes a rest by looking into the distance every few minutes.

5. Get Their Eyes Checked Regularly

School-aged children's vision can change often, and unexpectedly, until the late teenage years. Left uncorrected, poor eyesight can interfere with learning, and cause behavioral and attention issues.

Getting a routine eye exam is important as it can uncover vision problems, detect eye conditions early on, and significantly increase the odds of preserving long-term eye health. For those who wear glasses or contacts, it's important to check for any changes and update the prescription as needed.

Ensure  your child’s eyes are being cared for properly by scheduling an eye exam with Lifetime Vision Care in St. Petersburg today. Your child’s eye doctor can further educate them on eye safety and answer any questions you or your child may have.

Q&A

My kid frequently rubs their eyes. Is that bad?

Kids often rub their eyes, especially if they have allergies, irritated eyes, or they feel like something is stuck in their peepers. Rubbing can scratch the cornea, and transfer bacteria from the child’s hands to their eyes, causing an eye infection.

Instead of rubbing, have them wash their eyes with cool water to flush out any foreign body or irritant, and ease inflammation. If the problem persists, contact your child’s optometrist.

Other than reducing screen time, is there anything else I can do to maintain eye health & safety?

When you're at home, keep an eye on your children's playtime and make sure that none of their toys — or the toys at their friends’ homes — are sharp. Sharp plastic swords and toys with jagged edges can cause serious eye injuries.